SAFE | Safety Awareness Facts and Education | SIU

SAFE AT SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY Main Content

SAFE at SIU is a resource for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, staff and visitors of SIU. This website contains information about campus resources, crime reporting, crime prevention and campus safety. Additional information is available on the university reporting structure for incidents related to sexual violence, domestic and dating violence, stalking and sexual harassment.

WHAT IS TITLE IX?

Title IX states that:  "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance."  For more information, visit Title IX and Sex DiscriminationAny person (student, faculty or staff) who believes that discriminatory practices have been engaged in based upon gender may discuss their concerns and file complaints of possible violations of Title IX with SIU's Title IX Cooridnator.

Linda McCabe Smith, Ph.D.
Associate Chancellor for Institutional Diversity 
110 Anthony Hall MC 4341 
Southern Illinois University Carbondale 
Carbondale , IL 62901-4341 
(618) 453-1170 or (618) 453-4295 (fax)

HELP A SURVIVOR

TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF

It is important that you take care of yourself. We understand reporting incidents to the police and the university may be hard, that is why our staff is trained to help. All employees at SIU are trained to assist survivors with filing a report or seeking medical support. If you are not ready to seek support now, SIU encourages you to access free confidential support from the staff at Student Health Centers Medical Clinic and Counseling and Psychological Services. 

TALK WITH A FRIEND

The first person a survivor seeks for help is the most crucial in the process. If you are confided in by a survivor please follow the advice below:
  • Listen: This is the most important thing you can do, but it must be done without fear of being judged, rejected or blamed.
  • It’s not their fault: Assure them it is not their fault, nothing a survivor does justifies someone hurting them. 
  • Give them options: Share information with them about resources. Let them choose what they want to do and support that choice, even if you don’t agree with it. Give them the SIU Safe Brochure
  • Be there: Sometimes survivors want to talk their experiences, and sometimes they want to “get back to normal.” Be willing to listen when they want to talk or whatever other things you did as friends before the incident.
  • Get support: Help your friend get support, you don’t have to be their sole helper. Go with them to seek medical or counseling support, file a police report or report the incident to the University. 

RIGHTS OF A SURVIVOR

A survivor of sexual or domestic violence can request safety measures including, but not limited to:
  • No Contact Order
  • Interim Suspension
  • Modification of Living Arrangements
  • Modification Of Class and On-Campus Employment Schedules
  • Security Escorts 
  • No-cost Medical and Psychological Support
  • No-cost Academic Support
  • Assistance in Adding, Dropping, or Retaking Courses

TIPS FOR EMPLOYEES

  • Let them know your responsibilities: Let them know that you are a responsible employee, and you may not be able to keep the conversation confidential. Tell them you may have to report the incident to the University which includes completing an SIU Campus Crime Report.
  • Listen: This is the most important thing you can do. Be sure not to judge, reject or blame the survivor. Take accurate notes and provide the opportunity for the survivor to seek medical support, file a police report or a report with the University.
  • It’s not their fault: Assure them it is not their fault, and nothing a survivor does justifies someone hurting them. 
  • Give them options: Share information with them about resources. Let them choose what they want to do and support that choice, even if you don’t agree with it. Give them the SIU Safe Brochure
  • Fulfill reporting responsibilities if you are a Campus Security Authority or Responsible Employee: Share all known details of the incident by submitting an SIU Campus Crime Report.
  • Do not Investigate: Your role is not to investigate, only listen, offer support and give options. 

TIPS FOR PARENTS

As a parent, it can be difficult to know that your loved one has experienced violence. It is important to remember that your student has had their power and control taken away from them. You can help them regain it by listening to them, providing them with options, and respecting their decisions. Remember to take care of yourself:

  • Seek professional help for yourself and/or your student. SIU offers students with free counseling and psychological services to survivors of sexual and domestic violence.
  • Believe what your student tells you. Don’t doubt them if they have gaps in their memory, trauma affects everyone differently and it is normal for details to come out in bits and pieces.
  • Let them make decisions about how they want to deal with their experience. Be open to talking with your student about what they’re experiencing even if it is uncomfortable. 
  • Recognize your student’s need for privacy. Their boundaries have been violated and reclaiming personal space is important. Respect the time and space it takes to heal after a sexual assault.
  • Take care of yourself. Educate yourself about sexual and domestic violence and the healing process. Realize when you’ve reached your own limitations, and encourage your student to talk to a professional. As a parent of a survivor, you may have reactions of anger, sadness, and shame. Those are normal reactions! Find a supportive person or counselor with whom you can process your feelings so that your conversations with your student can focus on their needs.